Does Speed Reading Work?

As the world’s fastest reader people often ask me if speed reading works? Or is it just a gimmick or a fad and my response typically surprises everyone. The way speed reading is usually taught merely doesn’t work, and that is why I took a revolutionary approach to teach it. First, let me explain the problem with most speed reading programs.
The Problem With Most Speed Reading Programs
Most speed reading programs focus on speed rather than comprehension. They only focus on the mechanics of speed reading and not the psychology which is the crucial part. This reminds me of a funny story Dick Cavett, famed television host, told me after our interview. He said he was interviewing Woody Allen who took a speed reading program and read, “War and Peace,” in just five minutes. “That’s amazing,” Cavett said. “What do you remember?” Allen replied, “it was about the Russian Revolution, and that’s all I can remember.” That was the problem with speed reading. It was great for skimming but terrible for learning and now let’s see why.
Most speed reading programs use a simple strategy for increasing the reading speed that makes learning new material extremely difficult. You are asked to read several times faster than your comprehension rate for a few minutes, and then slow down to read at your peak comprehension rate. After viewing text at very high speed for a few minutes, when you slow down, you are reading faster than you were at the beginning. This mechanical approach to speed reading is the basis for most speed reading programs.
The problem? When you find a new word, idea, name, formula or anything you don’t already know, you need to slow down to learn it. As soon as you slow down, you start to lose your reading speed. It is impossible to read unfamiliar terms without slowing down, so most people wound up reading slowly again. This is not acceptable. That’s why I took a different approach to superfast reading with excellent comprehension. Let me explain how I accomplished this.
The Speed Reading Genius Breakthrough
I realized that reading is not learning. Neither reading slowly or quickly by itself is learning. You can read a Calculus book, and memorize the equations and still fail your examination. Why? Because you don’t understand how to use the formulas to solve problems. True learning is understanding the meaning and significance of what you are reading, and being able to use it when you need it. So how is this possible?
I developed a total learning solution in which speed reading was one of the tools. I use the mechanics that speed people up because they work, but then I train people on how their brain understands text so they can slow down to learn new information, and immediately go back to their superfast reading speed. By combining the psychology of reading with the mechanics of reading I eliminated one of the main problems associated with speed reading. But then I went several steps further.
Once I read something, and don’t understand it, I stop reading and use brain-based learning strategies to make the confusing information meaningful. By integrating study skills, I can learn complex information at high speed with excellent comprehension. Then I use brain-based memory strategies to lock the information into my permanent memory so I can use it when I need it. Finally, I use my training in Psychobiology (the Biology of behavior) to create the emotional intelligence state required to use the information on demand. Let me explain.
Imagine I teach you how to drive. I tell you to take your road test, and then you fail. Why? You got nervous about taking the exam. This is an emotional intelligence issue. Now imagine I teach you how to drive, and how to stay calm while taking the road test. What happens? You pass the exam. I show people how to create the emotional states they need to use the information they are learning successfully. The results have been spectacular with everyone in a scientific test doubling their reading speed or greater with excellent comprehension.
I conclude by answering your question. Does speed reading work?
Well, when you incorporate all the skills necessary for learning, use short cut methods and integrate both the mechanics as well as psychology you will find that speed reading not only works but works well. There is also evidence of famous people who could speed read, and I mention a few below.
John F. Kennedy: The former President of the United States could read an average of 600 words per minute which is much above the average reading speed of 200 words per minute. He encouraged everyone in his staff to take lessons to read faster.
Another US president Jimmy Carter and his wife, Rosalynn were speed readers and encouraged their staff to partake in speedreading courses.
Franklin D Roosevelt too was a speed reader he used a speed reading technique known as chunking where you start with reading a small group of words at once and then increase the groups of words you can read at once through practice. He was able to read entire lines at a glance, and some say even whole paragraphs. He could even skim a page and know the gist of what the author was trying to say in that page.
Theodore Roosevelt was known to read at high speeds. He was a master at skimming and scanning text. So he perfected that technique to be able to speed read. He once wrote a letter to his son and mentioned: “The wise thing to do is simply to skip the bosh and twaddle and vulgarity and untruth, and get the benefit out of the rest.” He was referring to the technique he used for speed reading.
There are many more examples, but it suffices to say that each of them was able to speed read by mastering a technique or a collection of techniques that enabled them to read much faster than the average reader. I have also shown how these techniques work in a couple of my blog articles but if you want to get a firm understanding and really delve deep into the speed reading techniques you can take a look at the speed reading genius course that I have developed over the past 30 years and it is backed with my 30 days money back guarantee.